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Mountaineer Sports Report

It has been interesting week for Oliver Luck

Interesting is certainly a good way to call it.
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It has been an interesting week if your name is Oliver Luck and you are athletic director at West Virginia University. To begin with Luck’s name came up as a prospective candidate for the University of Texas athletic director’s job, perhaps the premier AD job in the country, and the Stanford job.

Much points to the connection, including Luck’s time spent in Houston, Texas, managing a professional soccer franchise and building a stadium, his time running NFL Europe, his wife’s Texas roots and his knowledge now of the Big 12. Luck did not deny that any interest could be shown. On his portion of the pregame show before the WVU-Baylor game on Saturday night Luck refused comment. “My name gets kicked around for all sorts of jobs,” Luck said, “and I have decided not to comment at all on job opportunities.”

A story appeared late this week in the Charleston Gazette quoting school President Jim Clements that he had talked with Luck about his plans and Luck had assured him he was staying. “I sat down with Oliver,” Clements told the Gazette. “I told him I need to know because I’ve been getting inquiries, calls and texts, and he said, ‘Jim, I love it here; I’m a Mountaineer; I’m staying.’” That would seem to put such rumors to rest, but Luck’s refusal to talk about the situation and the fact that Texas can offer Luck a far more lucrative package than WVU can put together says this is not over yet.

It probably wasn’t accidental, either, that it leaked out this week that Luck is being named to the committee that will pick the four teams in the college football playoffs to create a national championship and also name the teams to play in the other major bowl games.

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